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connally who would become governor of texas, and john connally in 1959 ran into him in the street in polis and strauss was a lawyer in dallas at the time in the koln alisa i'm getting a group of fellows together to go to washington to talk about johnson's presidential nomination if you want to come along and that was the beginning of the end. he went along and helped support the nomination effort in 1960 which was field. kennedy won that year but after that, because, lee was his protege strauss became one step closer when johnson became vice president in the event in dallas when kennedy was assassinated he was one of the hosts don't tell me and he was very involved in all of that and one thing and wrote it in the book it's right for people to doubt will help to the i would definitely doubt myself to activity but i try to be more skeptical so when he would tell the stories about being in the hospital comforting moly after her husband got shot because he was shot also in the was a little skeptical and i went along and the reason it is in the book is because of the johnson library they had th
was coming from a more conservative place, he had p.m. and lbj and john connelly democrat from texas. if he didn't embrace the mcgovernite exactly, he definitely try to appease the mcgovernite. he made sure they had what they needed and he made sure that labor had what they needed and the lack caucus in the women's caucus who are trying at that time to grow, trying to expand so he really was not just a compromiser but a very skilled negotiator, making sure that everyone had a little bit of what they needed. and that was because he always said that his goal for 1976 was to be able to deliver a party to a candidate. he said i'm not going to deliver a candidate to this party. i'm delivering a party to the candidate and that is something that is not going on today in the republican party. they are trying to deliver a candidate to a very divided party. so he didn't know who the nominee would be in 1976. he certainly did not think it was going to be jimmy carter. no one thought it was going to be jimmy carter. he thoughts jackson or maybe humphrey or muskie, pretty much anyone over carter but he
the plastic soup and the pacific ocean i read it is the size of two states of texas. we could cut that in half would plastic debris in this mothering of aquatics life would work if it was just one state of texas instead of two states? i don't think so. we just have to cut back rather what we hope is about changing the system itself is it reminds me of another problem of the scarcity frame we think of the problem out there and don't look at the fact we have hit the limits to feed people. we don't see the enormous waste built into the food system where less than half of the grain that we produce goes directly to human beings. 1/3 goes to animals, and one-third of our fish catch those two animals. that is before you mentioned 30 or 40% of the third is wasted a lot of it because of the concentration of wealth they cannot store the food that they grow effective way. but how can we have hit the limits? fifty-five% through a 87% of the energy produced is wasted. but to explore, i get curious, what is it about this system of concentration of decision-making ending at generating more waste and what we
. we heard about the plastic soup in the pacific ocean. i read it's the size of two states of texas, so, okay, we could cut that in half. would a plastic soup, would plastic debris and smothering of aquatic life, would that work if it were just one state of texas instead of two states of texas? i don't think we think so, so the limits frame keeps me in that quantitative, oh, we just have to cut back, cut back, but rather what we tbhoa from an -- know from an ecomind, it's about changing the system itself that generates the waste. the word "waste" reminds me of another problem with the scarcity frame and limits being the problem. we think of the problem being out there, and we don't look at the fact -- oh, we hit the limits. with food, oh, we hit the limits to feed people. you hear that often. still, as i heard it 40 years ago, and, yet, we don't see the enormous waste built into our global food system where now less than half of the grain that we produce in our world goes directly to human beings. about a third goes to animals, which we know, you know, shrink its potential to feed us, a
-span.org/campaign2012. >> now the author of greenback planet and david greater appearing at the texas book festival to talk about their book. there are audience questions for just over an hour. >> fabulous to see such a crowd. the wonder of it has to do with the fact that the dollar might be relevant topic. we are really lucky to have two fabulous prolific writers with us today. what two topics could be more relevant than to talk about the decline in this climate of economic crisis? david graeber and h. w. brands to talk about their new books. i am assuming we won't have any trouble getting questions from the audience and let me do some housekeeping things first because i am hoping when you are all done over here you will go back in that tent and buy the books and the book signing tend, 15 minutes after the end of the session, the authors will sign their book at the book signing tend. one thing about the festival. i don't know about you guys but this is my favorite festival. i love south by southwest. [applause] i have never seen anything like it. the people who put this on our doing large work. th
of texas. and john connally in 1959 ran into bob on the street and dallas. connolly was a lawyer in fort worth at the time and strauss as a lawyer in dallas at the time. and connolly said i'm getting a group of fellas together to go to washington to talk about johnson's presidential nomination. do you want to come along? and now resorted to be getting at the end. he went along and he helped support the johnson nomination effort in 1960, which we know is failed. kennedy won that year, but after that because connolly was sort of johnson's protÉge, stress became one step closer to the white house when johnson became vice president. and then on the day in dallas when kennedy was assassinated, he was one of the hosts of that function, you know coming downtown. and he was very involved in all that. and i wrote it in the book that it's right for people to doubt my objectivity. i would definitely do my objectivity, but i tried to be more skeptical. the bob would tell me stories about being in the hospital, comforting deli after her husband had been shot also i was a little script to call and no
the plastic soup in the pacific ocean. i've read that it's the size of two states of texas. so, okay, we could cut that in half. would plastic soup, would plastic debris and smothering of aquatic life, would that work if it were just one state of texas instead of two states of texas? i don't think we'd think so. so the limits frame keeps me in that quantitative, oh, we just have to cut back, cut back. but rather, what we know from an ecomind, it is about changing the system it that generates that waste. the word "waste" then reminds me of another problem with the scarcity frame and the limits being the problem. we think of the problem out there, and we don't look at the fact. we say, oh, we've hit the limits like food. oh, we've hit the limits to feed people. you hear that quite often. still, as i heard it 40 years ago. and yet we don't see the enormous waste built into our global food system. where you less than half of -- where now less than half of the grain that we produce in our world goes directly to human beings. about a third of it goes to animals which we know, you know,. >> rink its
that played into his famous dissent in the flag-burning case? >> we start the lookout with the case of texas versus johnson. this was a case where a young man helped burn the american flag in dallas, texas and they had a law making it a crime to desecrate a national symbol such as the american flag so he was convicted. it's a freedom of political speech. it didn't have a lot of interest, it had a great deal of interest publicly because the original george bush was making a big thing about the flag waving a type of politics and was accusing dukakis, what was his first man i forgot, michael dukakis of being soft on patriotism. but anyway, everyone expected stevens who had a reputation as being pro free speech to oppose the state in affect and he didn't. he wrote a dissent saying that in this case the burning of the flag or of the symbol has tremendous value just as a political object and he felt in this case because i was the flag and not some other document or something like that that it should be kept coming and he cites in the decision not personally but he does allude to the world war ii e
award-winning journalist and the youngest state judge ever to be elected in texas, catherine crier joined court tv's distinguished team of anchors in november 999. 1999. she served as executive editor, legal news special in addition to hosting "catherine crier live," a fast-paced, live daily series covering the day's front page stories. catherine crier, a texas-bred independent with a spirited passion for justice, released several books on high-profile case such as the scott peterson case and the susan polk murder case. catherine has hosted episodes of court tv's signature prime time series, "the system," and numerous other specials such as the sake l jury speaks with dominic dunn, osama bin laden on trial and safe passage, voices from the middle school part of the network's public affairs initiative choices and consequences. prior to joining court tv, catherine anchored "the crier report" for fox news channel. [laughter] a live, hourlong, nightly program during which she interviewed the leading newsmakers of the day. catherine currently manages her own production company, crier co
, is that -- the three most important states are new york, texas, and california. and the way he explained it to me if you can't get a textbook in new york, texas, and california, you can't -- you basically -- it's worthless. the problem is the new york board is superliberal, the texas board is superconservative, and the california board is-under super crazy. and i don't actually have any personal experience with this. i'm just recounting it. once they kind of thread the needle, they're really reluctant to change it because if they change the textbooks too much to do. recent knowledge, then they have to go back through this, and almost all this will offend somebody. >> there's something else, too. and you're being too generous. we're like hispanic history month or something like that. and you would think that some of this africa story would be part of our history, and you know, i've always said if you want to do a real hispanic history, you should have the irish coming here because the irish -- a story that is almost unknown in america, even to the american irish -- of the defection of american iri
] one of my early ones was about lloyd benson, the former texas senator when he was named secretary of treasury. it was called lloyd benson, the short history of lloyd benson's dealings with special interest groups. was the man is known for broke will -- for pro-quote quickness. in texas that so people do business. that's $50 online. [laughter] that's not my shortest poem. my shortest poem is the political societal and philosophical implications of the o.j. simpson trial. that's the time. titles don't count. and the whole poem is, oj, oy vey. [laughter] now, maybe anybody shortest poem. >> you ever hear from politicians that say you're being too hard on me? >> no. i never have, and i've had this sort of nightmare which i have during the day. one of the reasons i don't hear from them, they won't even admit they read the stuff, but also i don't run into him because i live in new york and most of them are in washington. but i start having of 10 or 12 years ago, i started having this sort of daytime nightmare that i went to a dinner party in new york, and all of them were there. and in
thunderbirds. some of you might recall texas blues band with a hit record all tough enough. remember that? and so i worked with the tea birds for about a year and a half and that's how long it took me to get through the correspondence course. i would do the homework in the back of the bus or in the dressing rooms are afraid to chance to do so. when i finished it, i began to have a bit of confidence numbers and in land use and issues. and we have discussed a number of things to do within the land. again, it was a diversified farm. that road crops, cattle and some timberlands. but i kind of realized looking into other options like pecan trees coming ushers.com but all of those things require light of day to day work on my part. and we couldn't really afford to hire a manager who wanted to do this ourselves anyway. but the more i read and learned and studied him for a street, became fascinated with that. for one thing, it did fit my situation. i could pursue my career as a musician. it didn't require so much day-to-day work and it's a very long-term view of the use of the land and i kind of
conversations] >> the texas rangers. >> terrorism, right? terrorism is what kept him awake after that bad news that he got while he was reading to those kindergarteners if you ever saw that michael moore movie. it was quite a scene. anyway, but here's the point then, is are we really focused, not just saying we're focused about jobs, but are we focused about creating jobs now in the kind of economy that we're in, in a global economy where countries like china we won't embrace an awful lot of what china is, but what we can embrace is really an aggressive desire to generate economic activity that leads to the bottom line. so consider the contrast when we bring nissan to tennessee, or you bring honda somewhere. you're happy to have the plants, you probably give them the land. somebody like jennifer has said, you know, we can give you this incentive and that incentive and come here, don't go next door to alabama or tennessee, come to us. and the deal is struck. well, when gm goes to china and says, you know, we want to work with you, have a little joint vebture, build some cars, sell some cars jus
're not familiar with the borders along texas, how big they are, in arizona. but it is a lot of land that has to be covered, and it's the federal government's responsibility. it takes a tremendous amount of money to secure the border, but our country wants us to do that. we've invested in more border agents, in better technology, and i'm even coming -- trying to come up with some very cost-effective ways to improve the physical infrastructure of borders, because not only do they serve to protect our nation from people that shouldn't come in, but we also have to get a lot of things across our border, like all the commerce and traffic and vegetables and agriculture products and manufactured products that our businesses depend on to have good trade with canada and mexico, with nafta, which is a very important trade foundation for our continent. we just can't close our borders and shut it down. we have to keep it open, so america, unlike every other country in the world, mr. president, really, we're one of the only countries that is both has to fight hard for a -- fight hard for our security but
at texas a&m university. i love talking to him. >> who does get a shout out in the book. >> what? yet. what the heck, i have to take care of my family. [laughter] >> but the back -- best tech transfer program is probably mit, because they never take any money. they only take stock in the new company. they will give a professor a year off to work in the company, but the professor must promise after a year, to bring in a professional business person to run the company. and they've got a lot of other things. anyway, it works really well. and they're some of the models, but in general i think this question chelsea asked is something we always ought to be constantly asking ourselves. should this be privatize, should it not? that if you have a doctrinaire position each way, you might wind up with a bad decision. i'll give you another example. the united states is virtually the only big country that does almost all of its large infrastructure with 100% public funding. other countries don't do that. so the president actually has asked the congress to adopt infrastructure bank proposal that has bipa
wanted to write about whether the letters is a book from a republican in texas rewrites and angry email i knew i wanted that but also for them they want to show that yes he is that person the reads whatever comes in. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> i don't know. maybe i can go to montana to have one class of 15 kids but that is the extent. >> has the president read the book? >> i don't know. i doubt in terms of how much is going on but thinking maybe he has read the book then i remembered everything he read his very public with the white house a here's what is on the president's reading list. he is reading this book wrote the letters he is reading. i sent him a copy and a hand written note kurt rafik of the male but he does have a copy. >> i have not read the book but i plan on its. real and contact with the president and you had an interview. >> i was in contact with some of staff there were some who worked in the administration that i know well enough i could if i was writing come apart of the book was the education because it is all about different issues so it is to learn about education
this work at texas a&m university. >> who does get a shout out in the book. >> work? >> who does get a shot on the book. >> yeah, what the heck am i crazy care of my family. last night but the best tech transfer program is probably m.i.t.'s because they never take any money. they only take stock of the new family. they will give a professor a year off to work in the company, but the professor must promise after a year to bring in a professional business person to run the company. and they've got a lot of other things. but anyway, it works really well. and there's some other models, but in general, i ain't this question chelsea asked me something we had to waste because delhi asking ourselves. should this be privatized and should it not? but if you have a doctrinaire position either way, you might wind up with a bad decision. i'll give you another example. the united states is virtually the only country that does almost all of it large infrastructure with 100% public funding. other countries don't do that. so the president actually has asked the congress to adopt the infrastructure bank prop
warren were men of modest beginnings building wealth careers. ice was born in texas, and smaller than an office, and as you know, his parents were members of the river brethren, and when he left for west., it was the only time his brother heard their mother cry. he was responsible for the destruction of hitler's war machine first in north africa and then italy and the push across the northern european plain beginning with the d-day landings in normandy. he was urged to run for president in 1968, declined, and then -- 1948, declined, and agreed in 1952. he opened up the center of the country to commerce and trade, and later, of course, sponsored the federal highway system, at that time, the largest public works bromght in american history. his life was different, but with some parallels. he was born in los angeles where i live today, born in baker's field, and his dad worked for the railroad. warren and his sister grew up without much and grew up in public schools. he was a law school student at berkeley, not much of a student, by the way, another story. he was a veteran of world war i
. six states like texas and southern leaders and proslavery. rejuvenation to engage -- invade cuba and central america so that there would have more land. so you get the sense that even though the north has the majority of the nation's population and industry in rhode, it is the south that is the more brash and aggressive king. this is illustrated most graphically when massachusetts senator's take to the floor of the senate and get their -- gives a speech about kansas and slavery in its fenders. in reply to a south carolina carson, preston brooks approaches sumner, raises his bold top cain, and beats him almost to death on the floor of the senate in plain sight. for this act rex's is to lead lionized. this says most vocal of listen. so in diaries and letters and news reports, you get the sense that any slavery -- that mothers feel pushed around and billy by what they called asleep palace. we north democrats. they're called go faces because there were half one face and valuable in this hands of slaveholders. all three of the president's fit the description. a political party it -- c
out of the mess and the alternative isn't the big government and texas. all i am a pragmatic balance on this and i couldn't get an answer that is because that ideologies, that's the message and whatever the effect has been, whatever the actual prod maddock results, by george, if we say it often enough, people will believe it and they will quit thinking and by the ideologies and the domestic from all of us. >> we often need term limits. i don't know if they envision the politicians would be in power for all of these. >> i will address that. i want to be doubled to vote. if i'm going to vote for the same person over and over again and then it's gotten so frightening i begin to think maybe the term limits but until you realize it is the power on the hill it is the long-term staffers, the institution and not just the individuals in the front, and so where i come back down is unless we have literally supported a constitutional amendment to ban corporate money and politics you can raise the amount individuals can get so it is we are not going to allow people with more money you get your te
a conversation. originally -- in south texas some friends of mine and big business men and a very conservative guy, i didn't have the private piece of it at that point. he said make it private public. get the private sector involved. >> you are interested in that partnership between public and private. it can work. >> a big friend of this country. mitch daniels is doing a lot in indiana and turning it over to private corporation but on a smaller basis across the country water district are being turned over to private companies more profitably and efficiently. the state in which you live has 11,000 state agencies. this is a system that was designed for political patronage 100 years ago. it is not necessary for us to have that many state agencies here. long island as you go across the calgary each county has a different water district and different set of rules and well-paid commissioners. >> what would you do? >> consolidate a lot of it. consolidate lot of education in america. people have attachments and pride in these institutions. the system that is going to consolidate and change the reform
of democracy. but what kept him awake at night? the texas rangers -- terrorism. terrorism is what kept him awake after that, you know, bad news that he got while he was reading to the kinder -- kindergartners. are we really focused not just saying we're focused about jobs, but are we focused about creating jobs now in the kind of economy that we're in, in a global economy where countries like china where we don't embrace what they are, but we can embrace the aggressive desire to generate economic activity that leads to the bottom line so consider the contrast when we bring nissan to tennessee or honda, you're happy to have the plant, give the land, and jennifer said we give you this incentive and that and come here, don't go next door to alabama or tennessee. come to us. the deal is struck. when gm goes to china saying we want to work with you, have a joint venture, build some cars, sell some cars like your asian friends sell cars to our people, let's strike up a deal. who owns that operation? china. china owns half. shanghai motors and shanghai motors is owned by the city of shanghai oper
weight in the senate with states the size of texas and california and florida. >> do you see evolution in that area as will? >> absolutely. the discrepancies between states in terms of their population has grown over time. although there were some very large and small states at the time of the founding. nothing like the discrepancy that we have now. makes this an one of the most now apportioned bodies in the world by standards of one person, one vote. certainly the most important such institution. dissent is very powerful in the american politics, and to be a apportioned in this way. so that's what that book investigates. i find as you might expect that it makes a difference for lots?? of asp??ects as have the senate operates, including policy outcomes. >> what do you teach at the university was because i teach courses in legislative politics, ??aduate and undergraduate?????? level, congress class.???? >> would you go to school? >> and other university in nashville. >> where did you get your interest in the congress? >> i started out interest in american politics when i went to graduat
somewhat different types. ike was born in texas for 100 yards from here in a little white house smaller than the office he would eventually occupy as army chief of staff. as you well know his parents were members of the river bergman it pacifist group and yet when eisenhower arrived at west point it was only time his rather had ever heard his mother cry. he was of course the tramp and hero of world war ii responsible for the destruction of hitler's war machine first in north africa and then in italy and finally with a push across the northern european plain beginning with the d-day landing at normandy. he was urged to run for president in 1948 but he declined and then agreed in 1952 and once elected he distinguished himself principally in foreign and military affairs but he also embraced the construction of the st. lawrence the way to open up the center of the country to commerce and trade and later of course in response to the federal highway system@time the largest in history. warns life was different but with some parallels. he was born in los angeles where the today race raised in b
opener for yeltsin. it was true what he describes in his own memoirs. he was being driven through texas and said stop here. i want to have a look of this grocery store. he was still a little old soviet mentality that foreigners were only shown what the host country want them to see and he thought he was being conned by being shown other aspect of american life. >> host: he was going to take them by surprise. >> guest: he was to use an irish expression got smacked. something like air dryer to record prices. there were all sorts of different varieties of cheese and meat. from there to miami, he turned to his aide and said that is why the iron curtain was there. to keep us from learning how good things were in the west. >> host: he was ready when younger people would come in and say all at once -- >> guest: there were big bets on his instinct. very impulsive politician but was very courageous when he thought he should do something, he did it and he reckoned that the soviet union should end and that should be a very quick transfer and trusted that have to two others, one to pre price and th
texas if you didn't embrace them exactly she definitely tried to appease the mcgovernites. to make sure they had what they needed in the black caucus and the women's caucus who were trying at that time to grow in expand so he wasn't to compromiser but a very skilled negotiator making sure everyone has a little bit of with the needed and that was because they said his goal from 1976 was to be able to deliver a party to a candidate. he said i'm not going to deliver a candidate to this party i am delivering a party to the candidate and that is something that isn't going on today in the republican party. they are trying to deliver a candidate to a very divided party. so he didn't know who the nominee would be a 76. he didn't think it was going to be jimmy carter. nobody thought it was going to be jimmy carter. he preferred scoop jackson or pretty much anyone over carter that he looked past that as the chairman of the dnc and he saw it as his mission to keep his electorate to get her and he didn't care who the nominee was or who they stood for and how was a criticism leveled at him for his c
was being driven through texas and he said, stop here. i want to have a look at this grocery store. this supermarket. he was still of the old soviet mentality that foreigners were only showing what the host country wanted to show them, and he thought he was being conned. >> he was going to take them by surprise. >> and he entered this market and just was -- he described how he saw somebody in the checkout using something like a hair drier to record the prices. and he found out that there were all sort office different variety of cheeses and meats and on the plane from there to miami, he turned to his aide and he said, you know, that's why the iron curtain was there is to keep us from learning how good things were in the west and how much consumer goods were available. >> he was ready when some of the younger ideological economists would come in and say, all at once. >> gorbachev -- yeltsin made big bets on his instinct. a very -- he was very courageous. when he thought he should do something, he did. he reckoned that the soviet union should end and there should be a very quick tran
. maybe in texas there have been more, but i had not seen anything about this, and i could not believe it. the first thing i did was i filed of the of information act with the fbi did the fbi file which is thousands of pages. i even got with the fbi agents second down there where wires. i get the transcripts of everything that was set on the wires. the first thing he said when he walked into the restaurant is, if you're wearing a wire, i'm scared. that's on tape. so it was wild. but a year long interview airing everybody i could. >> there is one section in the book which i think is as great where there is that correspondence between that who is going by the name or by robinson. >> of play and run orbison. a zoologist it turns out. >> i did not know. your repenting their a mouse. those are, in fact. >> the really knows. in our room was very excited that i was writing his book. nasa gave half as a gift for solving the moonrock caper, they named astrid after him. so there is an emblem and astrid floating around the sons of mark everything in the book is reprinted directly. a lot of the dialo
export and slavery is also on the march exploding in states like texas and the southern leaders and the proslavery urging the nation to invade cuba in central america so they would have more land to plant. so you get this sense also that even though the north had the majority of the nation's population and industry it's the south that is the more this was illustrated most graphically in 1856 when the massachusetts senator charles sumner takes to the floor of the senate and gives a stinging speech about kansas and slavery and its defenders and then in the south carolina congressman preston brooks approaches him, raises his cane and beats him almost to death on the floor of the senate in plain sight and for this act he is instantly lionized in the south for, quote, lashing into submission. the senate's most vocal abolition. so in diaries and letters and news reports you get the sense that any feel beaten up and pushed around and bullied by what they call the slave power. there's a wonderful phrase in this era for the week northern democrats called both cases because they were in t
it was trying that out in south texas with some friends of mine, big businessmen. one of them come a very conservative guy. i didn't have the private piece about point. he said make it private public. >> and you're very interested in the partnership between public and private. you think it can work. >> yeah, it's a big trend in this country. mitch daniels is doing a lot. he's turning it over to private corporation. but on a smaller basis across the country, water districts are turned over and run more profitably and more efficiently. the state in which we live has 11,000 state age these. this is a system that was designed for political patronage 100 years ago. this is not necessary for us to have that any state agencies here. long island, as he drove across the county, each county has a different water district and district and set of and well-paid commissioners. >> would you do? >> out of consolidated a lot of education in america. it's very tough because people have attachments. they have pride in these institutions. and the system that is going to consolidate and change and reform that
. louis, missouri is able to come into the life of the white woman for whom she works and texas love life, website, her household, all of 35 like in 15 minutes flat. now, that is it. if you're a 45 year-old woman their job is to be the mentor to the young woman. your job, as a 45-year-old woman , kind of show or the ropes. but when this magical behavior happens the other direction and this person just literally has the keys, and is just go to fix all of it and in fact throat's a fixed immediately is that ever appeared on any sex in the city ever, at that point you know that they have passed and nanny. and mcenroe my friend and i looking at each other and saying, why? why did we discuss the a fund friendly movie and then, you know, she shows up for no apparent reason. she is this recuring conception that african american women don't need to have resources. they don't need to have equality they don't need to have the opportunity. there certainly and interested in contributing to their own communities. they're primarily there to serve as magical figures in the white domestic sphere. we can t
here to the university of texas. what are you teaching? >> guest: i teach a course in international history of the last century. what we learn from the worst in reconstruction and i'm also teaching a course on strategy and global policy. i do strategize to run an organization on a policy in a global world today? next job you teaching american history survey which i love. i love being able to expose to this material. so much fun. >> host: on american history survey course cromarty star? >> guest: we tend to break the course around the time of the civil war. i would love to do a year-long course. there's so many issues there and all the issues old and new again come into and what the debt crisis, questions of american foreign activity in 18th century and there. postcode is also the author of henry kissinger and the american century and the american foreign relations since 1898. why not go to start with 1898? >> guest: 1898 marks a moment with united states announces itself on the world stage. and it's recognized by other powers out at least been a major entity, major actor internation
in a prison camp in tyler, texas. and i wrote a warm sympathetic study of robert e. lee on the other hand. i want to take that puppy and maine, you go to the historical sinusitis and you see these men from the 20th maine, attend the maine, this is a very serious group of men who you can see 20 years past their musket bearing incarnation, but we think, confederacy naturally, you know, wanted to have their reunions. those reunions were going on with the grand army of the republic. a look about a series as he gripped you could ever see. now, i forget just where -- chamberlain, the other part of chamberlain. when lee and grant were finished with what they had to do with each other at appomattox, both wrote off, lee to go back to richmond to pick up the pieces of his life and so forth, and grant to go back to washington and sort of became a tremendous demobilization. the man left to accept confederate surrender was joshua chamberlain. and he rode just wonderfully eloquently about what happened. little bit so downplays his own part, because his men were lined up to receive the surrender. and acros
. in austin, texas, the timeline theatre at the naacp visited in the summer and was beaten by a white mob that included a sitting judge and then the governor the next day absolutely defended and said these troublemakers shouldn't even show up in this town. so, briefly onto talk about two kinds of racism that were permeating american society at the time. one is the one we all know, the long-standing view from the time people were brought over as slaves, you know, black people are lazy and simultaneously threatening. this confused view that is still around today, that is standard bigotry. there's also this new kind of racism that had evolved, which is based loosely on darwin, this idea that the world was divided to ethnic groups in these races are competing in that white people dominated the world. why civilization dominated the world and is colored races are threatening us. these books are not obscure pamphlet. they're incredibly popular books. one book was called the rising tide of color against white world supremacy. it's a very subtle title. [laughter] a man named alfred stoddard who ha
that that will be out there. but if it sells books, texas okay. [laughter] -- it's okay. i think, i hope knowledgeable readers will from those countries, particularly canada, will feel that i gave their side a pretty fair shake. because i really do my best to kind of throw myself into a very varied array of characters. one of the most sympathetic characters just to talk about canada for a moment, for my money, is justice sherwood who you're never heard of. who was one of the founders of the green mountain boys, so he's a vermont hero, but when the revolution comes, he cannot bear the idea of breaking with the on around key. his family's persecuted, he's thrown into what i call the gulag of the american revolution which is in connecticut. that was like going to siberia. you weren't coming back. he escapes, and he becomes the head of the intelligence network that the british are running out of canada, and he's conducting these covert negotiations with ethan allen. and as i say at one point in the book, he's a decent man in an indecent business. because this is, you know, it's real skull dug erie. but i
in the texas law review. he was contending with -- the american legal community. but what he said was that he pointed out that many states had no records of the debates in the ratifying convention. this is true. and makes it very difficult to talk about what was said it was recorded. the states that did have their debates recorded and published are open to tremendous suspicion. the published debates have several flaws he said. first of all, this is really the beginning of period were debates and legislatures and other similar bodies were recorded. stenography was a young craft and hudson claimed it took five years to master it. and few of the shorthand meant as difficult in the mid-18th century put in five years. so we were pray to their skills. they could not have taken down for failing account of these debates, and he didn't even try pick of course nor did james madison and the federal convention. thank god. coming, we can read madison's notes. is a single point of 600 pages, if we had a verbatim it would take up a whole wall. however, when it comes to this date ratifying convention, you wi
know, one of the letters in the book is from a republican in texas who writes this really angry e-mail late agent night. -- at night. i knew i wanted something like that in the book. but for them they wanted to show that, yeah, he hears that person too. he reads whatever comes in. so that made it work out. >> looks like this book would really inform teaching journalism and poly-sci. seems like it ought tock. >> i don't know if it is. i hope it'll be. you know, maybe i can pull some strings at montana and have one class of 15 kids read it. [laughter] but that's probably the extent. but thank you. yeah. >> has the president read the book? >> i don't know. he's got an copy. um, i doubt he's read the book. just in terms of, like, how much he has going on and, also, i was thinking about in the other day because in, like, a more like thinking, wow, like maybe he's read the book moment i was just thinking about what he reads, and then i remembered that everything he reads is like very, very public, and they release -- the white house o asian -- occasionally releases here's the president'
thought to undeclared wars costing between worse by a good bible believed in the way bar from texas and there was no talk about deficit spending. he coincidently became this huge issue when we let up and saw one of them in the white house. now we've got to do something about it. so let's be honest with people and talk about the fact that not everything that comes packaged wrapped in flags and most of the time they write for my point of view as they talk about in "sex, mom, & god" and "crazy for god" as well as profoundly unpatriotic. as the father of a man who thought and afghanistan and iraq human should rank right right of high school and i read about in the boat because oprah had on me show called keeping faith from a father-son story about love in the united states marine corps, i have an appreciation for military and an appreciation for fine. nothing gets your attention like having your children shot at. and so i don't speak at some trendy whatever outsider who knows nothing about the same. been there, done that, gone down to the event can have researched my novel baby chat, li
year of his life in a prison camp in texas. so you know, and i wrote a war and sympathetic of robert e. lee. on the other hand, i want to tell you up in maine you go of those historical societies and see these men from the 10th maine, for you then at their reunions 24 years later is a very serious group of men who you can see there 20 years past their musket bearing incarnation
have a product we will be able to make it for you in michigan. sycophant texas and mississippi all have california companies doing solar panels. okay i have to ask about solyndra. you are all familiar with solyndra, right? five ied come is that the highway? eight bayh 80. those beautiful plants on the east side. so what happened? there's a situation of the $500 million of doing exactly what you are saying, guaranteeing the loans, placing an active role, building the new sector. we talk about it in the book. >> it is a tough question. does the united states provide access to capital for industry is that it believes is in its critical national interest. we should be energy independent, should we spawn and invest in new technologies? sometimes when you invest in the new technology win, sometimes you don't win. this particular program had 40 applicants as the projects the win this one project failed it was a big number. but if you placed no bets you lose every time and other countries are placing bets aggressively and if we are not in the game we will continue to be bystanders to the loss o
. then there was the educated texan from texas who looked like someone in technicolor and people of means, decent folk should be given more votes than drifters, criminals, degenerates, atheists and in decent folks, people without means. yosarian was and springing rhythms and the letters the day they brought the texan in. it was another quiet, hot, untroubled day. the feet pressed heavily on the roof. dunbar was lying motionless on his back again with his eyes staring up at the ceiling like a doll's. he was working hard at increasing his life span. he did it by cultivating boredom. dunbar was working so hard increasing his life span that yosarian thought he was dead. they put the texan in a bed in the middle of the war. it wasn't long before he donated his views. done bar set up like a shot. that is it! he cried excitedly. there was something missing! all the time i knew there was something missing and i know what is! he banged his fist into his palm. no patriotism, he declared. you are right, yosarian shouted back. you are right! you are right! you are right! the hot dog, brooklyn dodgers, mom's apple pie. t
in texas who writes this really angry e-mail late at night. i knew i wanted something like that in the book, but also, like, i think for them they wanted to show that, you know, yeah, he hears that person too. he reads whatever comes in. so that made it work out. yeah. >> seems like this book would inform teaching journalism and poly-sci. do you know if it's being assigned in classes? seems like it ought to be. >> oh, thanks, i appreciate that. i don't know if it is. maybe i can pull some strings in montana and have one class of 15 kids read it. [laughter] but that's probably the extempt. thank you, yeah. >> has the president read the book? >> i don't know. he's gotten a copy. i doubt he's read the book just in terms of how much he's got going on and also, i was thinking about in the other day like thinking, wow, maybe he's read the book moment, i was just thinking about what he reads. and then i remembered that everything he reads is, like, very public. and they release, the white house occasionally releases, like, here's what's on the president's reading list. and it would probably look r
, spent the last year of his life in a prison camp in tyler, texas, okay? so, you know, and i wrote a warm, sympathetic study of robert e. lee. on the other hand, i want to tell you that up in maine you go into these little historical societies, and you see these men from the 20th main, the 10th main, the 14th main at their reunions, and this is a very serious group of men who, you know, you can see they're 20 years past their musket-bearing incarnation, but they, you know, we think -- the confederacy naturally, you know, wanted to have their reunions and everything, but those reunions were going on amidst the gar, the grand army of the republic, and they look about as serious as any group you could ever see. now, i forget just where -- chamberlain, oh, the other part of chamberlain. when lee and grant were finished with what they had to do with each other, both rode off; lee to go back to richmond and pick up the pieces of his life and so forth, and grant to go back to washington and sort of begin a tremendous demobilization. the man left to accept the confederate surrender was joshua cha
in record numbers and built new industries. they gave us do our did news fives and built states like texas and california. got married in record numbers, went to college and then set about the 19 50s to achieve prosperity none of them believed they could have. and they resisted some of the changes but in fact is i remind people betty friedan was a member of "the greatest generation." she began to change the attitude about women in america. and the african-americans who served came back and that became the foundation for the civil rights movement because they were not going to be discriminated against in the same way. and then the next generation really did change that. the members were most articulate critics as well as george mcgovern and gaylord nelson and the others who gave another kind of voice to it. so i am satisfied that there was a generation worth celebrating. that is how i look at a. >> take us back a little bit when you began and you were an anchor so many years back then. was it easier back then do think that it is now? >> in my business? much easier. when i started in televis
in texas all you never have done is all you'll ever will do. that is no longer applicable. if all you ever do so you have never done it then in this hyper-connected world you will get below average. we are now all the things and lake woebegone were all the men are strong, all the women are beautiful, all the children are above-average. average is officially over. what this means for education is two things. we have to bring our bottom to the average and the average so much higher. requiring more education and better education and. we conclude this chapter and the whole section by trying to think through, what is the right mode for educators, parents, as they think about describing and inspiring their kids to thrive? we would leave you with three attitude points that we would suggest. things like the new immigrant, think like a new immigrant. thinks like an artist and and things like a waitress at perkins pancake house in minneapolis. what do i mean? how does the new immigrant think? i come to this country there is no legacies spot waiting for me at johns hopkins. the new immigrant understa
to the olympic games, i get a call on the telephone. i left east texas state. the school was integrated one year before it got there. i'm coming off lenox avenue in new york. it's like putting vinegar and alcohol together, some combustible thing. it was just bad. so i came back and i'm hoping my mother paint the kitchen on the phone rang. she says johnny, someone on the phone want to talk to you. as professor harry a mouse. he says to me, john, they're having a meeting downtown at the americana hotel. do you think you could breakaway? someone asked me to invite you to the meeting. no problem. let me check with my mom. mom, they're having a meeting. can i go? if they want you in a meeting you need to be there. i'll handle the rest of this. alright man, tell me where to come. i lacked in this beautiful lobby. my mother was a perfectionist of the furniture. you've got to a five years before you can sit on it. i know what that's about. so anyway, i walk in a hotel and i'm looking and seeing all these beautiful sophia and i said i can get this from a mother, that. i'm just thinking about getting it a
ben-ami, founder of j street is the author. >> from the texas book festival in austin, dana priest talks about her latest book, "top naudet america." >> hello, my name is brenda bell. ra a reporter for the american statesman, and my guest here is danahe priest, a coach a guest i prize-winning reporter.est, pulr [applause] >> thank you.>> >> will we are here to talk about her book, "top secret america." it was published last month, anw i have been reading her book fot the past week, and i had to say as a reporter, one of the thingn i wondered about right off the ert was what it's like towond negotiate with something which is basically a man's world, as female reporter. ins essence, dana is like a female cops reporter. if you're a reporter you know yr that means that it means it plays out in different ways. i wanted to ask you about that. how did you get into this particular specialty as a a journalist? >> first, let me say thank you for inviting me because it is one of the last official trips i have on my book tour. it couldn't be better weather and our love austin and i am glad to
, christina bittle from hochison, delaware, mitchell bast yoa, fort worth, texas, and clark schroeder, clarksville, tennessee. they didn't have to be her. they could be home with their family during this holiday season as the other pages are. instead, they stayed to help keep the senate running smoothly. they didn't have to be asked, they volunteered. we really expect a lot of our pages. i so appreciate their work. i've had two granddaughters, mr. president, who were pages. my two oldest grandchildren. and it actually changed their lives. and i say that as serious as i can say anything. ryan and mattie were not interested very much in government. they had other things to do as juniors in high school. but they came back here in this environment where they saw us wandering around and making speeches and voting, they got interested in reading the newspapers, watching the news more intently. my two granddaughters now are both in -- i'm sorry in france on a study abroad, one is a junior at new york university, other is a senior at the new school in new york. i really mean that their lives
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